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2013 Annular Eclipse

An annular solar eclipse, which will be seen in Western Australia, the Northern Territory and Cape York May 10, will be another once-in-a-lifetime solar event not to be missed.
The 2013 Annual Solar Eclipse follows on from the 2012 Total Solar Eclipse in Cairns and Far North Queensland, putting Australia in a unique position of experiencing two solar eclipses in less than six months.
The last time this happened was in 1871 and the next time Australia has consecutive total and annular eclipses will be in 2194, making this event a once-in-a-lifetime occurrence.
The 2013 Annular Solar Eclipse will start at sunrise in Western Australia, cross over the Northern Territory and Cape York before heading towards PNG.
The communities of Kowanyama and Pormpuraaw will see the full annular eclipse (97% of totality), giving these communities the unusual honour of experiencing two solar eclipses within six months.
You don’t have to be in the line of its path to see this celestial event, as there will be partial eclipses throughout Australia. (See map below for details).

2013 Annular Eclipse

In the north, Cooktown will see 92%, Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea 89%, Cairns 88%, Mt Isa 86%, Uluru 83%, Townsville 80%, Mackay 72%, Rockhampton 65% and Brisbane 51%, according to NASA’s website. For exact times for your location, and the length of visibility, visit NASA's website

2013 Annular Eclipse

What are annular eclipses?

Annular eclipses are renowned for looking like a “ring of fire”. They are similar to total eclipses in that the moon appears to pass across the centre of the sun, but because the moon is too far from earth to cover the sun completely, viewers with special solar glasses or filters see a ring of bright sunshine around the dark shadow of the moon, hence the “ring of fire”.

How to view it

This spectacular sight can only be safely observed with approved solar glasses, filters or by projecting an image of the eclipsed sun on to a flat white surface. This eclipse is not safe to view with the naked eye at any time, unlike a total solar eclipse where you can look at the sun during totality.
During the annular eclipse, look at the shadow of leafy trees cast during the partial phase. You will see numerous partially eclipsed suns projected through pinhole gaps between the leaves. You will also notice that that it gets a bit cooler as the eclipse deepens.
The sky will darken a bit, making it feel like an early twilight.

Get your safe solar viewing glasses

Make sure you have safe solar viewing glasses on hand to view the 2013 Annular Eclipse as wearing the safety glasses is one sure way to safely see this astronomical event.
2012 solar viewing glasses are available now.
4 pairs for $10 or a box of 50 for $69 (inc P/H & GST)
Order now to avoid disappointment.
All orders must be placed by Friday, May 3.

Eye safety

You don't want to miss out on this exciting astronomical event, so eye safety is the most important thing to consider when viewing the 2013 Annular Eclipse.
Be aware that permanent eye damage can result from looking directly at the sun or looking through a camera viewfinder, binoculars or a telescope.
Believe it or not, when only 1% of the sun's surface is still visible, it is still about 10,000 times brighter than the full moon!
Staring at the sun under such circumstances is like using a magnifying glass to focus sunlight on to tinder. The retina is delicate and irreplaceable and will become severely damaged even after only briefly looking at the sun. There is little or nothing a retinal surgeon will be able to do to help you if you damage your retina, so don't take any chances.

Tips to avoid eye damage

  • Look at the sun only through solar eclipse glasses that have been CE certified and pass Australian and New Zealand safety standards.
  • Never look directly at the sun with your naked eye.
  • Do not look at the eclipse through binoculars or a telescope.
  • Do not look at the eclipse by stacking sunglasses or CDs together or by looking at the sun through exposed film.
  • You can also use welder's goggles with a rating of 14 or higher for safe eye protection.
  • Indirect projection is another safe way to view the 2013 Annular Eclipse.
  • To prevent permanent eye damage, your glasses must be worn for the duration of the eclipse.

All about eclipses

The moon's shadow consists of three different areas - the innermost and darkest part (umbra), the lighter, outer part (penumbra) and an area beyond the umbra only visible from earth when the moon is at apogee (antumbra).

All about eclipses

Total eclipse - A solar eclipse is when the moon's umbral shadow traverses earth (the moon is close enough to earth to completely cover the sun). During the maximum phase of a total solar eclipse, the sun's is totally blocked by the moon. That is the only point where you can view the eclipse without safety eye protection.

Hybrid eclipse - A hybrid eclipse is a solar eclipse in which the moon's umbral and antumbral shadows traverse earth (the eclipse is both annular and total along different sections of its path). These eclipses are also known as annular-total eclipses. In most cases, hybrid eclipses begin as annular, transform into total and then revert back to annular before the end of their path.

Partial eclipse - A partial eclipse is when the moon's penumbral shadow traverses earth (umbral and antumbral shadows completely miss earth). During a partial eclipse, the moon blocks part of the sun.

Annular eclipse - This solar eclipse in when the moon's antumbral shadow traverses Earth (the moon is too far from earth to completely cover the sun). During the maximum phase of an annular eclipse, the sun appears as a blindingly bright ring surrounding the moon – the ring of fire.

Upcoming eclipses

The next eclipse occurs in November 2013 on a very thin band (so thin that it's annular at one end, designating it a hybrid eclipse) in the mid Atlantic Ocean and central Africa. Unfortunately, this is a very short eclipse – lasting about 90 seconds at its greatest and that point is in the ocean off east-central Africa.
The next full total solar eclipse isn't until March 2015 from the Faroe Islands north of Scotland, north to Svalbard and the North Pole. The United States will have a total solar eclipse in August 2017.



The 2012 Eclipse

A Total Solar Eclipse happens when the moon passes between the Earth and the Sun and the two heavenly bodies look as though they are the same size.
This occurs because the Moon is 400 times smaller than the Sun and is coincidentally 400 times closer to the Earth, making them appear to be the same size in the sky.
During a Total Solar Eclipse, the Moon moves in front of the Sun and completely blocks our view of it, casting a shadow on Earth and sending it into darkness. It begins as a barely visible notch out of the Sun and over the next hour or so it widens to eventually consumes the Sun, turning day into night. This state is called totality.
The shadow moves across the Earth’s surface in a narrow path, generally from west to east at a staggering 2,250 kilometres an hour along a line called the Path of Totality. This is because the Moon orbits the Earth while the Earth rotates.
During totality, the only visible part of the Sun is the glow around the eclipse knows as its corona.
The only way to witness an amazing Total Solar Eclipse is to be in the shadow’s path, which has an arc that is typically 16,000 kilometres long and varies between 160 to 270 kilometres wide, and partial solar eclipses can be seen over 4,500kms from the track of totality.
Remember, you can’t look at the eclipse with your naked eye – you must have your Cairns Solar Eclipse Solar Viewing Safety Glasses on. These glasses have been specifically manufactured for the purpose of looking directly at the Sun.

The Path

The shadow path of the 2012 Total Solar Eclipse starts at sunrise inear Darwin, in the Northern Territories. It will then travel across the Gulf of Carpentaria and across Cape York.
The track across Cape York is about 140km wide and extends from the area around and to the north of Kowanyama on the west coast through to between Bloomfield and Innisfail on the east coast.
The shadow then passes out over the South Pacific Ocean travelling to the north of New Zealand and makes no further landfall.
The centre of the track crosses the east coast of Cape York near Oak Beach, just south of Port Douglas and north of Cairns.

The Path
The Path

Time and duration of the 2012 Total Solar Eclipse

The exact time of the start of the Total Solar Eclipse will depend on where in the shadow path you are.
Totality will start at about 6:37am on the west coast of Cape York and at about 6:39am on the east coast. Remember this is the time of the total eclipse. The partial eclipse, leading up to totality, can take up to an hour.
The duration of the total eclipse will increase the closer you are to the east and the maximum duration on the Australian mainland totality will be about 2 minutes and 5 seconds at the point where the centreline crosses the east coast near Oak Beach.

Event

Time

Direction

Alt

Partial eclipse begins

5:45 AM

109°East-southeast

2.1°

Full Eclipse begins

6:39 AM

105°East-southeast

14.2°

Maximum Eclipse

6:40 AM

105°East-southeast

14.4°

Full Eclipse ends

6:41 AM

105°East-southeast

14.7°

Partial eclipse ends

7:41 AM

102°East-southeast

28.6°

The next Total Solar Eclipse

After the 2012 Total Solar Eclipse in Queensland Australia, the next Total Solar Eclipse will be March 20, 2015 in the Atlantic Ocean, Thorshavn on the Faroe Islands (approximately halfway between Norway and Iceland), Spitzbergen (in the Arctic at the northernmost part of Norway) and the North Pole.
Since average cloud cover during March for these regions is high, visibility is likely to be limited.

The longest Total Solar Eclipse

So far, the longest duration in which the Moon totally covered the Sun, known as totality, was during the solar eclipse of July 22, 2009. This Total Solar Eclipse was 6 minutes and 39 seconds. The longest possible duration of a Total Solar Eclipse is 7 minutes and 32 seconds. The longest annular solar eclipse of the 21st century took place on January 15, 2010, with a duration of 11 minutes and 8 seconds.

What to watch for

There are a number of stages to watch during the 2012 Total Solar Eclipse in Cairns and Tropical North Queensland. This is an exciting event to experience – and an once-in-a-lifetime eclipse for most of us. So make sure you don't miss out watching this event and be sure to protect your eyes at all times with your own 100% safe Cairns Solar Eclipse Solar Viewing Safety Glasses.

The beginning is when the Moon's shadow on the Sun first becomes visible. Also known as a partial eclipse, it looks like a piece - or a bite - has been taken out of the Sun. During the partial phase of the eclipse, the Moon gradually covers the Sun, which can take about an hour.

As the total part of the eclipse approaches, the sky becomes darker and an ominous black shadow approaches from the west. The Sun becomes a thin crescent. The temperature can drop significantly.

In the final few seconds before totality, the last brilliant parts of the Sun's surface shine through valleys and mountains on the moon and you will witness what are called ‘Baily's Beads'. These are points of light seen on the edge of the moon's disc. Soon the beads are reduced to a single point. This is when you watch out for the spectacular ‘Diamond Ring' effect, when only one point of light is left and it looks like a giant diamond ring in the sky.

As the last bright point winks out, the Sun's pink upper surface called the chromosphere can be seen around the edge of the Moon and often prominences, pink loops of plasma extending above the chromosphere, are visible.

Totality is when the shadow of the Moon covers the entire Sun, with only the faint halo of the Sun (corona) being visible. The corona, which is the Sun's outer atmosphere composed of ionised gas from the Sun, is only visible during an eclipse and is the amazing view people from all over the world come to experience. The temperature drops, the sky darkens and you cannot hear a sound from birds, insects or animals.

At this point, there will be a glowing light around the horizon, which is caused by the scattering of different wavelengths of light in the atmosphere.
It is only during totality that you can take your Cairns Solar Eclipse glasses off. At all other times, you need them on for full protection.

At the end of totality, as the moon moves away from the sun, everything is reversed, with the prominences, diamond ring and Baily's Beads visible again.

The Moon gradually uncovers the Sun, again taking approximately an hour until the partial phase is over.

When the partial eclipse of the Sun ends, light returns and life is back to normal. The temperature is back to normal, the sky lightens again and you can hear the birds, insects and animals once again.

Types of Solar Eclipses

There are three general types of solar eclipses.

1. Partial Solar Eclipse

The most common one is the Partial Solar Eclipse. During a Partial Solar Eclipse only a portion of the Sun's surface will be covered. It will appear as if a large bite has been taken out of the Sun. You will see a Partial Solar Eclipse during the 2012 Total Solar Eclipse.

2. Total Solar Eclipse

When the bright surface is completely covered, a Total Solar Eclipse is taking place, which is what to expect during the November 14, 2012 Eclipse. Surrounding the shadow of a Total Solar Eclipse is a Partial Solar Eclipse, which means you will see a partial eclipse up to the total eclipse and then a partial eclipse afterwards. Only during a Total Solar Eclipse is it safe to look at the Sun, where you can then see the corona and prominences. Up until totality, you must wear your Cairns Solar Eclipse Viewing Glasses at all times to protect your eyes.

3. Annular Solar Eclipse

If the cone of the shadow from the Moon falls short of the surface of the Earth then an Annular Solar Eclipse takes place. In an annular eclipse the surface of the sun is obscured across the mid section but there is still a ring of photosphere visible. It appears as a ring of fire and causes very odd donut-shaped pinhole projections. Like a Total Solar Eclipse, there is a Partial Solar Eclipse surrounding the Annular Solar Eclipse location.

Eye safety

You don't want to miss out on this spectacular astronomical event, so eye safety is the most important thing to consider when viewing this once-in-a-lifetime 2012 Cairns Solar Eclipse.
While our natural instinct is to look away from the Sun, during an eclipse people – and especially children – are tempted to look because the Sun isn't so intensely bright.
However, be aware that permanent eye damage can result from looking directly at the Sun or looking through a camera viewfinder, binoculars or a telescope even when only a thin crescent of the Sun remains.
Believe it or not, when only 1% of the Sun's surface is still visible, it is still about 10,000 times brighter than the full moon!
Staring at the Sun under such circumstances is like using a magnifying glass to focus sunlight on to tinder. The retina is delicate and irreplaceable and will become severely damaged even after only briefly looking at the Sun. There is little or nothing a retinal surgeon will be able to do to help you if you damage your retina, so don't take any chances.

Remember

  • To be safe never look at the Sun outside of the total phase of an eclipse.

  • Only do so wearing Solar Eclipse Safety Glasses.

  • Once the Sun is entirely eclipsed and its bright surface is hidden from view, it is completely safe to look directly at it. It has been described as one of the greatest sights in nature.
    But, be aware of that fact that you only have a very short time to do so.

  • Remember, if you see any part of the Sun's surface it can cause eye damage, which is why wearing certified safety solar eclipse glasses is a must if you're going to be outside during the 2012 Cairns Solar Eclipse.

For more up-to-the-minute information on steps for safe solar viewing visit Office of Fair Trading

Tips to avoid eye damage

To make sure children and adults avoid eye damage during the 2012 Eclipse, remember:

  • If you can see any part of the Sun's surface you will still sustain eye damage.

  • Look at the Sun only through solar eclipse glasses that have been CE certified and pass Australian and New Zealand safety standards, such as the Cairns Solar Eclipse official viewing glasses, which have been specifially manufactured to look at the Sun.

  • Never look directly at the Sun with your naked eye.

  • Do not look at the eclipse through binoculars or a telescope.

  • Do not look at the eclipse by stacking sunglasses or CDs together or by looking at the Sun through exposed film.

  • You can also use welder's goggles with a rating of 14 or higher for safe eye protection when viewing the 2012 Cairns Solar Eclipse.

  • Indirect projection is another safe way to view the 2012 Solar Eclipse.

  • The only time that the Sun can be viewed safely with the naked eye during a total eclipse is when the Moon completely covers the disk of the Sun.

To prevent permanent eye damage, your glasses must be worn for the duration of the eclipse.

Did you know?

  • The next Total Solar Eclipse will be March 20, 2015 in the Atlantic Ocean, Thorshavn on the Faroe Islands (approximately halfway between Norway and Iceland), Spitzbergen (in the Arctic, at the northernmost part of Norway) and the North Pole. Since average cloud cover during March for these regions is high, visibility is likely to be limited.

  • The longest Total Solar Eclipse of the 21st century was July 22, 2009 off the coast of Southweat Asia. This Total Solar Eclipse had a maximum duration of 6 minutes and 39 seconds. The longest possible duration of a Total Solar Eclipse is 7 minutes and 32 seconds

  • During an eclipse, local animals and birds often prepare for sleep or behave confusedly. They will not make a sound.

  • The width of the path in which a total eclipse is visible is at most 167 miles wide.

  • The maximum number of solar eclipses (partial, annular, or total) is 5 per year.

  • Watch for crescent shadows as totality approaches as light filtering through leaves on trees casts these unusual-shaped shadows.

  • Local temperatures often drop 20 degrees or more near totality.

  • In Tahiti, eclipses have a romantic connotation. They believe the eclipse is the lovemaking between the Sun and the Moon, so people in Tahiti look forward to the eclipse as a sign offertility and good things ahead.

Superstitions and cultures

Throughout the centuries, solar eclipses were considered a bad omen because early cultures saw the Sun as a life-giver and therefore superstitions abound in association with this natural phenomenon.
Unusual superstitions were believed and followed – pregnant women were told to stay indoors, not cut vegetables and to not sew to prevent deformed children; people stayed indoors to avoid ‘bad rays' from the eclipse that were full of germs; and some people believed cleansing themselves in holy rivers would cleanse them of any evil influences of the eclipse.
Nowadays people understand the true nature of this amazing natural event, but some people still beat drums, pots or pans to ward off bad spirits.
In India, food is neither eaten nor cooked during an eclipse. Many believe that because the Sun's rays don't come to earth, germs increase. People in India also immerse themselves in water up to their necks to be cleansed.
In Thailand, lucky objects are bought to ward off evil omens. Since black is the colour of Rahu (the demon of darkness), some people in Thailand buy up everything black including black chicken, black liquor, black beans, black eggs, black rice and black moss sticks.
In Tahiti, eclipses have a romantic connotation. They believe the eclipse is the lovemaking between the Sun and the Moon, so people in Tahiti look forward to the eclipse as a sign of good thing ahead.

Future Total Solar Eclipses (2013-2035)

Year
 

Date

Duration

Location

2013

NOV 3*

1:39

Atlantic Ocean, central Africa

2015

MAR 20

2:46

N. Atlantic Ocean, Norwegian Sea, Svalbard

2016

MAR 9

4:09

Indonesia, N. Pacific Ocean

2017

AUG 21

2:40

United States (from Oregon to South Carolina)

2019

JUL 2

4:32

S. Pacific Ocean, Chile, Argentina

2020

DEC 14

2:09

Chile, Argentina

2021

DEC 4

1:54

Antarctica

2023

APR 20

1:16

Indonesia

2024

APR 8

4:28

Mexico, United States, Canada

2026

AUG 12

2:18

Greenland, Iceland, Spain

2027

AUG 2

6:22

Gibraltar, Iceland, Spain

2028

JUL 22

5:09

Indian Ocean, Australia, New Zealand

2030

NOV 25

3:43

S. Africa, Indian Ocean, Australia

2031

NOV 14

1:08

Pacific Ocean

2033

MAR 30

2:37

Alaska, Arctic Ocean

2034

MAR 20

4:09

Central Africa, Middle East

2035

SEP 2

2:54

China, N. Korea, Japan, Pacific Ocean

Kids Corner

Buzz"Hey Kids, we hope you all got to see the Total Solar Eclipse over Cairns and Port Douglas, it really was spectacular.
We also hope you used your solar viewing glasses to witness the event and will keep them to remind you of the eclipse for years to come.
Thanks to all of you that entered the colour-in competition. We had a lot of entries and the choice was very difficult, however we have chosen one lucky winner for the first prize of the Limited Edition Buzz T-Shirt... Congratulations Camdyn Goody of Holloways Beach on your very artistic entry.
Although the competition is over the free Colour-in and Activity sheets are still available to download."

Download Colour-in Page Download Activity Sheet

Make sure you get your official Cairns Solar Eclipse Viewing Glasses today as a memento of this once-in-a-lifetime event.
Very few souvenirs of this event are still available, which makes the Cairns Solar Eclipse viewing glasses a must-have keepsake in remembrance of this occasion.
They are now available for the low price of $2.50 each and are available in a 4-pack for only $10.00. Each 4-pack is available p&h-free if delivered in Australia.

4 Pack - Australia Wide
4 pack of glasses inc p&h Australia Wide
 

50 Pack - Australia Wide
50 pack of glasses inc p&h Australia Wide
 

50 Pack - Cairns CBD
Display box + 50 units Inc
FREE Delivery within the Cairns CBD
(RRP $4.99)

50 Pack - Australia Wide<
Display box + 50 units inc
p&h Australia Wide
(RRP $4.99)

Display

Suitable for children of all ages. Only to be used under adult supervision. Not to be used with damaged lenses. Cairns Solar Eclipse Viewing Glasses are certified by British Standards #0086 notified body HP2 4DQ and the Australian/NZ Standard AS.NZS 1338.2 & AS.NZS 1338.3:1992. Cairns Solar Eclipse is a subsidiary of Random Press. All imagery and intellectual property associated with Cairns Solar Eclipse© is copyrighted and remains the property of Random Press.